The following post originally appeared on the DDB Canada blog as part of the Radar 10am One Thing series of posts.

The internet connects billions of people to each other every day. It allows us to talk to people around the world, instantly. It lets us share and create art. It can help us learn.  It helps people who might not otherwise have a voice be heard.

Unfortunately, some of the world’s governments want more control over the internet as we use it today. They want to be able to censor it, spy on it or otherwise manipulate it, and they are often supported by organizations that don’t have the public’s best interest in mind.

 

Enter the #FreeAndOpen campaign from Google. With a real-time map displaying the names and locations of those who have pledged their support and a video to put a face to some of these people, the company whose informal corporate motto was once famously “Don’t be evil” is really trying to do some good. 3 million people have already added their names to the map online.

 

Visit Google.com/TakeAction to learn more about what’s at stake and pledge your support at FreeAndOpenWeb.com.

This is an important issue that goes far beyond the advertising industry and our work at Tribal DDB. We urge you take a moment to consider how a free and open internet has benefitted you, and how it can do so much more for the entire world.

The One Thing is a result of the daily 10am meetings held in the DDB Canada offices, where our digital teams meet to discuss new online trends, tools and technologies. Today’s One Thing was written by Tribal DDB Toronto Social Media Strategist, Parker Mason.

For an archive of the 10am links, visit our Delicious account and Pinterest board.

Follow Radar on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/RadarDDB

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You're reading BlogCampaigning. We write about public relations, social media, video games, marketing and pretty much whatever we feel is important. We've been around since August, 2006. Right now, It's mostly written by Parker Mason.