Posts Tagged ‘Adam Gorley’

Adam Gorley: Gentleman, Scholar, Blog Editor

Adam Gorley is BlogCampaigning’s copy editor, and the one responsible for scheduling our posts.

Sometime he doesn’t get a chance to edit one of my posts until a few hours after I send it to him.

That’s because he also has another (read: real) job that keeps him busy. Part of this other job involves writing articles for the First Reference blog, a site about “Business, Payroll, Employment Law, Internal Controls & You!”

For an example of one of his recent posts on the First Reference Blog, check out Workplace human rights: Overt racism in the workplace – it’s still here.

A few weeks ago, he also wrote a post about what to do about the problem of employee theft in the workplace that I thought was hilarious, but only because I read it a few hours after finding out that April 15 is Steal From Work Day. (I probably won’t be adding that to my calendar.)

Thanks for your work, Adam.

-Parker

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Adam Gorley is BlogCampaigning’s resident copy-editor, but he also moonlights as a DJ. Here’s his take on using a laptop to spin tracks.

Imagine this: you’re the DJ at a bar—the night’s entertainment. You’re using a laptop; you’ve got some software that you’ve tried out before and you like better than anything else you’ve tried for the purpose.

Things are going pretty well, until right in the middle of the tenth song or so the application quits unexpectedly with no warning and no message—what! You scramble to switch to another program (iTunes is all you’ve got available) and find a song quickly to fill the gap. Then you load up the application again—it probably just crashed, right?—surely it won’t happen again. But no, it does happen again after another ten songs, and you realize it’s because you’re using a trial version of the software. Well, bloody hell, a little warning somewhere would have been nice, you think, and you spend the rest of the night cueing songs in iTunes and hoping nobody notices—and of course, cursing the company that made that other application.

Well, that happened to me about eight weeks ago at The Painted Lady—the first time I played at that bar—and, man, was I unhappy about it, by which I mean Embarrassed. I won’t name the application that closed down on me, because I don’t want anyone to use it, which is a shame, because otherwise it’s a decent lightweight laptop DJing app.

I might sound like an ass for trying to use a software trial to DJ a party, but, you know what? To me, that’s the purpose of a trial: to try the product out—not for ten songs, not for 100 songs, but until I’m ready to buy it. I would prefer to have the functionality of the application somehow restricted rather than face a completely unexpected shutdown. All I’m asking for is a warning here software developers, that’s all I’m saying.

It turns out that iTunes is an acceptable—if very weak—substitute for bare bones software. (You might laugh—please feel free—but I can say this confidently because I’ve had to use it exclusively on three occasions now.) And by adding a few features, it could actually be good—yes, iTunes could be a reasonably good (basic) DJing application, with the addition of greater crossfading control, current song protection, and two music windows. That’s all. It would be far from great, but in a pinch, I wouldn’t worry about using it.

Of course, none of that can take away the fact that I’m using a laptop and a mouse (or, worse, a trackpad) to DJ, but that’s another story.

So, maybe you can help me find a good free/open source mixing application for Macs?—the simpler the better. And if it’s compatible with the M-Audio Torq Xponent, I like that too.

-Adam Gorley

Check out Gorley’s playlist from that night on 199x.org

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I’ve been using Twitter now for a few months, and I still have little idea of it’s purpose—or if it even has one. At it’s base, Twitter is a simple way to share and receive bits of information, the modern currency. It’s like a data marketplace—a microcosm of the internet itself, and more manageable than the world wide web. But I like that it has undefined boundaries, and that users have come up with new uses for it.

I don’t go out of my way to read about Twitter’s development on technology blogs or whatever. I have my interests (technology and internet culture among them), and I read about them semi-regularly; but I don’t have the time or the interest to consume or sort through all of the blather, opinion, and predictions about something like Twitter, which I would prefer to explore myself.

That said, here are a few of the ways in which Twitter has changed my internet and information consumption behaviour.

1. Interest-targeted information
I never had a selection of specific blogs that I would visit regularly to find news on a certain topic. I retrieved stuff from the internet mostly via news sites (e.g., TheStar.com), search engines, and aggregators (e.g., Digg and Reddit), each of which serves a particular purpose for finding information. Google news was my main news source for a brief while a couple of years ago. I also began using Google Reader to follow with pitiful—make that pathetic—regularity my friends’ blogs.

These all might have their own purposes, but I found them inefficient because they forced me to visit a website and scan through bits of info for what I wanted to read. I had heard of RSS feeds, which could send interesting links directly to a central location, such as your e-mail or a web application like Google Reader, but I was too lazy to bother figuring it out, and besides, Facebook had captured most of my internet attention; and with Facebook, I could share information as well as receive it.

This was all before Twitter. I looked at Twitter last year some time and thought, like just about everyone else on the planet (that’s facetious western arrogance, by the way): “What is this nonsense? Who cares about what everybody/nobody has to say about their nonsense lives?” I hardly realized that millions were already paying attention to others’ nonsense on Facebook all day long. But Twitter just seemed too simple and pointless: why would anyone actually want to know about what others were doing or, you know, thought about stuff?

Well, I was wrong. I mean, I still don’t care about what most people are doing or what they think about stuff—my use of Twitter has actually made this abundantly clear. I also note that recently (even before Twitter) I’ve been using Facebook far less than in the past. The thing is, now I can “follow” “twitterers” who “tweet” information in which I am interested, as well as my friends—those who are currently taking advantage of the service—and all of that information goes to one central place, where I can scan it with far greater ease than before.

For example, I used to visit Digg, which aggregates user-submitted stories from the web, placing the top stories (by users’ votes) on the “front page”. This is incredibly useful, but the content is still all over the place. Current events and world politics are combined in an unholy mixture with pictures of cute animals, celebrity “news” and UFO and crop circle sightings, and eventually, I found myself disillusioned with sifting through all of the stuff I wasn’t interested in. As for friends’ blogs, as I mentioned, I simply didn’t look at them very often, probably because I was spending my online time scanning Digg.

Twitter allows me to narrow the scope of my information retrieval. I follow certain news sources and blogs that mainly focus on local (i.e., Toronto) news, for example:

Torontoist for general Toronto news, mostly written by local independent journalists
BlogTO for more general news
NOW Magazine for the “alternative” news
Urban Toronto) for a great look at Toronto’s history and future

Some of my other interests are satisfied via:

The Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project
Tech news, commonly involving Google at myunblinkingeye
News about all the good food we produce in Ontario from Foodland Ontario

I follow friends (including the writers of BlogCampaigning):

Justin Broadbent, a terrific artist, illustrator, photographer, and videographer
Angie Johnson, fashion designer and Montréal boutique owner extraordinaire
Tyson Bodnarchuk, another terrific artist and Montréal boutique owner extraordinaire

And I even follow the odd celebrity:
Neil Gaiman, writer of fantasy and science fiction
Rainn Wilson (kind of), via his “big questions” blog, Soul Pancake

I could go on, but I fear that I’m already pushing the boundaries of attention, and will raise the ire of my fellow blogcampaigners with my first post.

So, to wrap up: maybe you’re not an information junkie to the extent that I am, but if you use the internet to seek useful or interesting information for personal or professional use, and you find you’re not satisfied with your current methods, I recommend you give Twitter a try. It’s not difficult to understand and use, and it should be even easier for people who are already somewhat social-media savvy.

Let me know if you’ve got questions. I probably won’t be able to answer them, but I’d like to hear them!

Upcoming:
Twitter as human-powered search engine—the new (better) Google!?
Twitter as hyper-modern communication tool—not just for nerds!

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The whole reason I got involved with BlogCampaigning was to check the grammar on Espen’s English writing (he’s Norwegian, in case you missed it). When Jens started writing for us, I edited his posts as well (based on my small sample size, I’d say that Norwegians frequently mix-up singular and plural when writing in English and Germans write paragraph-long sentences rather than using a few periods).

Now, we’ve got someone else to do that copy editing: Adam Gorley. He’s a Toronto-based professional copy editor, and he volunteered to have a look at each of our posts before they go live. I’ve never thought I was a perfect writer, and I’m sure that long-time readers of this blog will have noticed a few typos, grammatical errors and even unfinished sentences here and there. I don’t envy the work he’s going to be doing on Jens’ posts.

I’m hoping that with Adam Gorley’s touch, these things will be a thing of the past.

He’s @AdamGorley on Twitter and he also maintains his own blog of miscellany at AdamGorley.Blogspot.com. While he’s gainfully employed right now, I’m going to go ahead and say that if you need any help with Copy Editing, he’s probably your man.

-Parker

(PS: I wanted this post to be a surprise for him, so he didn’t actually get a chance to edit it. Any errors are mine)

(PPS: Once I saw Adam play a 90-minute game of Ultimate frisbee wearing only sandals when everyone else was wearing cleats – that takes guts)

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You're reading BlogCampaigning. We write about public relations, social media, video games, marketing and pretty much whatever we feel is important. We've been around since August, 2006. Right now, It's mostly written by Parker Mason.