I found this quote on Reddit via user Reasonably Plausible, and really liked it:

“Human beings are scary. We breathe a corrosive gas, drink one of the most potent solvents. Our preferred method of hunting was persistence hunting, where we chased animals until their body simply gave up and died. We can eat just about anything we find, which means that we don’t need to stop for food when chasing our prey. If we can’t find food, that’s fine. Our body will simply begin to eat itself so that we don’t have to stop chasing our prey. We walk upright, we sweat, we don’t have much body hair, which allows us to radiate away our body heat. This means that excessive time or extreme environment wont stop our hunts. If the animal fights back against us, we can take massive damage to our extremities and lose half our blood and still live. Our entire existence is owed to persistence, endurance, and determination. When we put ourselves to a task, it gets done, period. And this instinct is still affecting us today. 332BC: Alexander the Great hits a stalemate with the fortified island city of Tyre. Instead of going back defeated, he builds a kilometer long bridge in order to raze the city. 49BC: Cesar, after defeating the Gauls and invading Britain, turns a political fight into a civil war by invading Italy with only a single legion. He eventually becomes dictator starting a world superpower whose engineering feats are only recently being broken. 1804AD: A charismatic French general declares himself Emperor and sets off to conquer much of mainland Europe. He is captured, exiled, and then escapes. The soldiers sent to recapture him instead lay down their arms and join him. 1961AD: One man decides that we will go to the moon, despite much of the technology to do so not even existing yet. Just eight years later, two humans stand on the surface of the moon and look back upon the Earth. 200 years ago, we didn’t have railroads. 100 years ago, we didn’t have airplanes. 50 years ago, we didn’t have spaceflight. 25 years ago we didn’t have the Internet. We’ve already inherited the Earth and soon we WILL inherit the stars and anyone or anything that stands in our way will be eliminated one way or another.”

 

I got a pretty hilarious email from Betabrand who wrote in to tell me that they saw the best results when their social media content included a close-up of a male crotch clothed in Betabrand products. I’m not sure it will work for everyone company, but the numbers don’t lie (see the charts bel0w), and it’s an interesting way for a company’s creative to be so heavily driven by their clicks and web traffic.

 

 

Their concept of “Sock Insurance” is also pretty neat.

I’ve been a bit busy lately, and haven’t had time to do my weekly wrap-ups of drones in the news but here goes:

Apparently some chaps at the Imperial College London have created a drone that works as a 3D printer, in that it sprays out a foam-like substance as it flies and can build things. It’s supposed to mimic the way that swifts (a type of bird) build their nests, and the researchers say it can be used to repair areas inaccessible to humans, like wind-turbines.

Slashdot reports that in March, a passenger plane nearly collided with a civilian drone. As our skies fill with these little objects, this type of thing will become increasingly common.

And if that didn’t terrify you, the news that DARPA is getting funding to create swarms of drones that are less reliant on their human operators and work more as a team with each other might.

 

 

And while it’s not really a “drone”, a company in Florida has created a little running robot called the “Outrunner” than reach speeds of 20mph. It seems to be an early version, so it will be interesting to see what else they can do with it and if it will have any uses.,

 

http://io9.com/darpa-wants-to-teach-military-drones-the-meaning-of-tea-1572126878

I think I might have missed one of my weekly recaps of drone and quadcopter news, but that’s because I’ve been doing a bit of travelling lately.

Up first is the story of an apparently hacked drone crashing and injuring a triathlete in Australia. The story has made the rounds across a number of different publications, but I first read about it on Kotaku. What I liked is one of the first comments on that article:

Nope. This guy is a complete jackoff. Either he’s flat-out lying, or he was grossly negligent and incompetent… In either case, fuck him.

First of all, let’s start with the airframe. It’s a $20 Chinese knockoff of a DJI Flamewheel hexacopter, that he no doubt purchased from Hobby King. (The fact that it’s not DJI motors or anything else is a good tipoff.) And even a properly-configured $100 Chinese flight controller would’ve RTL’d (Return To Launch; climb to a safe altitude and fly back to the GPS coordinates of where it took off from.) upon loss of control. (Even a $60 one, really.)Nevermind the fact that any RX/TX setup you pay more than $50 for won’t be interfered with that easily. Bottom line is, once again, either he’s flat-out lying and it was operator error, or he was flying a dangerously unfit piece of equipment overhead of people.

 

The second interesting news item from the last few weeks about drones is a collision of technology trends, with the University of Sheffield announcing they’ve designed a drone that can be 3D printed and flown that same day. I can see situations where it’s not feasible to bring large numbers of drones to a location, but where a 3D printer and materials are readily available.

Apparently Google is also getting in to the drone game. According to a link that Jason Guitard sent my way. I’m not really sure what to make of this news – in the scale of drone company acquisitions, it’s probably pretty big. In the scale of Google, it’s probably not a big investment on their part. According to the article, they plan on using it to potentially map the earth in more detail and/or to provide quicker internet speeds around the world.

 

Lastly, the Daily Dot wrote an article about some guy in California who took the first “Drone Selfie”. I’d like to refute that claim, as this Instagram photo from last summer clearly demonstrates that I beat them to it with my Parrot AR.Drone 2.0. You can check out some more photos I took with that drone here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’ve been reading BlogCampaigning for the past month or so, you’ll have noticed that I’m doing weekly recaps of drone-related news. You can find the previous posts here. 

First up is a cool post on RoboHub about an organization named Drone Adventures who have done an aerial survey of Fukushima, site of the Tsunami/Nuclear disaster three years ago. It has some interesting observations on the state of the area, but what I liked most is that it seems they are using the same type of drone that ReRoll is using the map the earth for their open-world game. Maybe we’ll see Fukushima as the first level?

 

 

Next up is Flone, a drone created by a group of artists and computer engineers which uses a smartphone as the control mechanism. Read more about it here. 

 

And lastly: It sounds like there’s going to be a sequel to Top Gun but this time it will be Tom Cruise vs Drones. I’ll watch it, but only for the drones.

 

If you’ve got any other drone-related news, leave me a comment or Tweet me. Otherwise, check out the other weekly drone posts I’ve done here.

Another week on planet Earth, and another set of interesting news about drones.

First up, Foreign Policy magazine is reporting that the Pentagon might use a fleet of “underwater drones” to help find Malaysian Airlines flight 370.

 

Also in the news is Drone Hire, who have recently posted that they’ll be accepting Bitcoins for payment. The company appears to be a loose organization of drone operators willing to rent out their machines and services.

 

And lastly. DDB Canada/Tribal Worldwide recently released a new spot for Subaru Canada for the WRX. Read more about it on Slashgear.

 

I think I was as surprised as anyone about the news that Occulus Rift, VR-darling of the indie game community had been acquired by Facebook for $2 billion dollars. Some of the reactions were more interesting than mine, and I’ve captured a few below.

The following comic was the top post on Reddit for a few hours today, and sums up what I think a lot of people’s thoughts about the situation are:

Next up is a post on Reddit’s R/Funny section titled “Well, looks like Simpsons called it again.” Although it does look like the Simpsons are predicting a Virtual Reality version of Farmville, the originally game was actually “Yardwork Simulator.

 

The following Tweet is my personal favourite reaction the the news (though it might be lost on those who aren’t fans of the Metal Gear Solid video game series):

 

 

 

And the last, but possibly most important, reaction comes from Notch. The man behind the popular Minecraft game and apparently an early investor in the Oculus rift Tweeted that he thought Facebook was creepy, then followed it up with a lengthy blog post, a highlight of which is below:

Facebook is not a company of grass-roots tech enthusiasts. Facebook is not a game tech company. Facebook has a history of caring about building user numbers, and nothing but building user numbers. People have made games for Facebook platforms before, and while it worked great for a while, they were stuck in a very unfortunate position when Facebook eventually changed the platform to better fit the social experience they were trying to build.

I’ve always thought drones are interesting, so I’m going to start doing a weekly recap of any good drone or quadcopter related news.

First up, there’s a great video of  an (in)famous Sydney surf break called Ours. It really takes a drone’s-eye view to understand how little water is left in front of the wave:

 

Next up is a beautiful few pieces of video of some ice caves, shot by a drone:

 

 

And lastly, there’s an interesting article on the Guardian’s site about how China is going to start using drones to investigate pollution in the country. Apparently, it’s possible to tell if an industrial building is polluting by the colour of smoke they’re putting out.

That’s it

If you’ve been following the Bitcoin saga online, Newsweek would have you believe that the legendary founder of the world’s hottest cryptocurrency is Dorian Nakamoto, a 64 year old man in California.

Mike Hearn breaks it down for us on his website

 

 

This post originally appeared on the DDB Canada Blog. 

 

Virtual worlds are big and getting bigger: The world of Skyrim is just under 40 square kilometers. Grand Theft Auto V‘s map is 126 square kilometers.  DayZ, a recently-released survival game, has a map size of about 230 square kilometers. Middle Earth, the fictional world of Tolkein’s Lord of the Rings saga, is about the size of the British Isles and has been recreated virtually.

Developers of the upcoming game ReRoll are dreaming bigger. A lot bigger. Like, 510 million square kilometers bigger.

That’s because 510 million square kilometers is the surface area of the Earth, and they’re planning on using drones to map our entire planet, creating the biggest open-world game ever.  It’s an ambitious project, and like a lot of crowd-funded games, might never come to fruition. However, we’re interested in the way that it is further blurring the lines between real and virtual. The Montreal-based team behind the game is funding it via crowdsourcing on their website ReRollGame.com. Their announcement video will help show you just how big this project is going to be.

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You're reading BlogCampaigning. We write about public relations, social media, video games, marketing and pretty much whatever we feel is important. We've been around since August, 2006. Right now, It's mostly written by Parker Mason.