Archive for the ‘Marketing’ Category

Even after all these years I’ve been in advertising, it’s still exciting to see an idea go from research, through to strategy and a finished execution. That’s why it’s great to see the creative that my colleagues at DDB developed to promote SONY’s line of High-Resolution audio products:

As part of the campaign, we’re working with music bloggers across Canada to share content and give reviews about these products. Check Ride the Tempo if you want to try and win a pair of these great SONY headphones now.

Otherwise, learn more about SONY’s High-Resolution audio products at store.sony.ca/sound-evolved

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What do Punk Rock and Bird Watching have in common? Paul Riss. That’s because he has just finished a “big year” (birdwatching lingo for seeing as many bird species as you can in one year) and is making a documentary about it. He’s also getting a tattoo of every bird species he spotted, and there’s punk rock involved.

 Paul is a creative and talented individual at DDB Canada (my employer), so I’m really interested in seeing how this will turn out. Here’s what he says about the project:

“I’m most excited about the fact that younger people might take a second look at birding because they always thought it was just for retired people. If they get interested, it generally leads to a love of the environment on a grander scale. “

Follow Paul on Twitter (he’s @ThePaulRiss), support Punk Rock Big Year on IndiGoGo or just check out his blog (it’s got lots of interesting notes on his bird watching travel and info on ways you can support bird conservation.

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I’ve been a a huge fan of Instagram for the past couple of months now. I know it’s all about the people you follow, but Facebook is too full of brand posts for me, Twitter is just news and often I’m not interested in clicking through. Instagram is a quick-hit of beautiful images.

Anyways, here’s a great shot of a Vancouver sunset on Instragram from my friend Natalie that she uploaded to Instagram:

 

Below, you can see the shot I took of Natalie taking her photo:

Are you on Instagram? Follow me. I’m Parker now there.

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The following post appeared originally on the the DDB Canada blog as part of the Radar DDB 10am series of blog posts and emails I contribute to at work. 

A few months ago, Pepsi launched a global campaign, “Live For Now,” by redoing Pepsi.com to feature a waterfall of branded content and fan comments about the beverage. It was a unique way to embrace social media while not relying too heavily on third-party networks. More recently, Pepsi also partnered with Twitter.

On Tuesday night, we started to see what that partnership was capable of as Pepsi delivered on that “Live For Now” promise by streaming a Nicki Minaj concert on any Tweet with #NickiMinajNow hashtag. As the go-to site for what’s happening now, we think Twitter was a perfect channel for Pepsi and this campaign. It’s also a great reminder that the world still loves a super-star endorsement deal.

Check out an archived version of the concert or just take a look at some of the tens of thousands of Tweets from users talking about it.

If you liked that, you might be interested in knowing that Nicki Minaj also wrote a song for Adidas just for the “All Originals” video.

We also wrote about Pepsi’s year-long partnership with Twitter here.

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If you’re a regular reader of BlogCampaigning, you might have noticed that we often slow down our posts during the summer months. Normally it’s because I’m outside enjoying the great weather, but this year it was because I was working on an amazing project for McDonald’s Canada called “Our Food. Your Questions.”

You might have seen this video that was part of the campaign:

Or you might have just seen the site, McDonalds.ca/YourQuestions:

Or you might have just seen some of the great answers that my team of writers wrote in response to the thousands and thousands of questions that Canadians asked about food at McDonald’s Canada:

No matter how you saw it, I hope it gave you new appreciation for the food that McDonald’s Canada serves. I also hope that all of the hard work by an incredibly talented Tribal DDB team was able to shine through.

-Parker

 

 

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I kinda feel like the hardest part about working for the GoPro marketing department would be choosing WHICH amazing videos of the thousands uploaded they should share with their Twitter followers.

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Have you ever wondered what kind of car you should by? Check out the autoLyzer, a Facebook App developed by DDB for autoTRADER.ca.

It works by analyzing your Facebook profile (including Likes, Friends, City, Age and a number of other factors) to determine the perfect car available on the autoTRADER.ca website for you.

Try the app for yourself on the autoTRADER Canada Facebook page, and let me know which cars it chose for you.

-Parker

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Great email, Marvel. You've really made a compelling case for the The Avengers movie here.

I’ve never been a huge fan of email marketing and the fancy, HTML newsletters that are such a big part of it.

These are the emails you get that start off by saying “Having trouble viewing this email? View it on our website.”

How many other advertising (or communications) formats start off this way?

Somehow, I don’t think companies would be willing to invest in TV commercials if we said “This TV commercial is going to be great, but most people won’t be able to view it right away – they’ll have to push another button, or watch it on our website.”

Yet these fancy HTML emails persist. They persist at the expense of wasted hours from talented designers and coders whose time could probably be spent creating something way more beautiful and useful.

For a time, my hosting provider (DreamHost) used to send out plain-text emails. They were very simply formatted. They could be read easily and quickly digested. One of these was even sent from an Apple store on one of the demo versions of the first iPhone.

And yes, I’m sure I could set up my email so that that it always displays images and I always see how great these emails are. But I don’t. And I bet a lot of other people don’t either.

What do you think about fancy, well-designed HTML emails? Worth it or not? Do you read them? Does your email tool display the images for you, or block them?

-Parker

 

 

 

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When I first grasped the concept of what a “weblog” was back in 2005 and the types of amazing stories, opinions and information in these things, I loved BoingBoing. To me, it was everything a website should be.

Overtime, I’ve grown sick of it. At one point, I stopped even reading BoingBoing. Now I mostly just check in a few times a week, using it as a thermometer with which to take temperature of a particular inward-looking sector of the internet.

In between reposts from Reddit and a creepy obsession with girls and ukuleles, the BoingBoing crew likes to lift their noses up high and stick it to the man by hypocritically thumbing their noses at the advertising and PR industries.

I say hypocritically because I imagine that fairly large portion of revenue for the site comes from either the sidebar banner ads, in-stream advertising features or Watchismo sponsorship.

Referring to Chevy-sponsored OK Go! video as one that was “done in partnership with the maker of that particular” car just strikes me as childish.

Look, I’m sure Chevy and their agency are probably overjoyed that BoingBoing embedded it, even without naming the brand. But seriously, BoingBoing: Get off your high horse. Chevy created something you thought was cool. Deal with it.

-Parker

 

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A few weeks ago I was listening to a RadioLab podcast about Games. In this episode, hosts Robert Krulwich and Jad Abamrod spoke to Brian Christian, an author who recounted the story of the checkers craze of the 60s that culminated in the World Checkers Championship in 1963. Apparently. this championship was a series of 40 games between the world’s two top players.

All 40 games ended in a draw. 21 of those 40 games were the exact same.

“Checkers had gotten to the point where there was a perfect game of checkers,” Brian said as he discussed how the top players memorized previous games and knew the ideal countermove for the other player’s moves. “This was rock bottom for the checkers community.”

The name for this knowing of all the games, all the moves, is The Book.

Brian continues on the podcast to say that the same thing happens in chess, and that there is an equivalent book  (actually a computer program called “Fritz” these ays) of every chess game played by grandmasters for the past few hundred years. Although there are way, way more variations, there are occasions where two grandmasters will play the exact same game that has been played years before. Nowadays, the first 20 moves or so in major chess games are totally by The Book: the two players playing moves that they’ve memorized, just like their checkers predecessors.

To chess enthusiasts, the most exciting part (and true brilliance) is when players go off The Book: that moment when they make a move that hasn’t been done before in the history of recorded chess.

When I first started my career 5 years ago, there were no best practices for social media. There were no case studies. Everything was new. Everything we did was off the book.

Now it seems that everyone is staying on the book. Facebook brand pages are almost cookie-cutter copies of each other. Pitch emails to bloggers feel about as personal and special as a Hallmark card.

I still think there is a ton of opportunity to go off the book. I just worry that we’re too concerned with playing that perfect game.

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You're reading BlogCampaigning. We write about public relations, social media, video games, marketing and pretty much whatever we feel is important. We've been around since August, 2006. Right now, It's mostly written by Parker Mason.